Official ASME Group

Environmental Engineering Division

The ASME Environmental Engineering Division (EED) promotes the art, science and practice of engineering in all issues pertaining to the environment.

EED Technical Committees

This committee serves the ASME membership by integrating the concept of pollution prevention with the production and use of mechanical power for all sectors of industry, academia, and government. Among its objectives, the Pollution Prevention Committee aims to disseminate information regarding pollution prevention, expedite the adoption of a pollution prevention ethic in environmental protection, serve as a conduit to all ASME members and other organizations on pollution prevention issues, assist industry and government in the development and implementation of pollution prevention programs, and promote the evaluation and use of technologies which have a potential for pollution prevention in mechanical engineering applications.

This committee explores the technological aspects of remediation of contaminated sites, including underground water. An important function of Environmental Remediation Committee is to assist the exchange of information among various government agencies, industry, and academia.

  • Air Pollution Control

This committee aims to facilitate the dissemination of information on air pollutants associated with industrial operations. The Air Pollution Control Committee promotes the development of relevant control technologies and their continued improvement to meet the needs of industry. The Air Pollution Control Committee advises industry on the performance and cost of air pollution control systems, and communicates the developments and design improvements that have occurred in the industry. It further advises industry on the capabilities of various technologies to control air pollutants including air toxics. The Air Pollution Control Committee emphasizes the application of control technology and ways to improve the art and economics involved. This committee also focuses on current and developing regulations and how the law will drive the technology.

  • Water Pollution Control

This committee aims to facilitate the dissemination of information on water pollution and its control. The Committee covers all water media including groundwater and surface water. The Water Pollution Control Committee promotes the development of relevant control technologies and their continued improvement to meet the needs of industry. The Water

Pollution Control Committee advises government and industry on the performance and cost of water pollution control systems, and communicates the developments and design improvements that have occurred in the industry. It further advises industry on the capabilities of various technologies to control water pollutants. The Water Pollution Control Committee emphasizes the application of control technology and ways to improve the art and economics involved. This committee also focuses on current and developing regulations and how the law will drive the technology.

This committee endeavors to facilitate the exchange of information for the purpose of enhancing the technological base of hazardous waste management. The Hazardous Waste Committee promotes the application of engineering principles in management of hazardous waste and provides assistance to the engineering profession in meeting the increasingly stringent regulatory requirements.

This committee addresses the unique issues in the management of wastes containing radioactive and other waste constituents. Its activities include technologies applicable to characterization; minimization and processing: storage and disposal; and regulatory standards. Because much of mixed waste is produced by the government facilities, the consideration of unique nature of government activities are included in the technical issued covered by this committee. This may become a joint committee with the Nuclear Engineering Division (NED).

  • Environmental Communication

This committee attempts to bridge the gap between the true technical information on environmental issues, particularly environmental technologies, and the perception of the engineering profession and the public on this topic. The Committee will interface with ASME Governmental Affairs.

  • Regulations and Standards/Regulatory Engineering

The application of sounds engineering principles in design, promulgation, and enforcement of regulations is critical in reducing the regulatory burden, particularly in times of budgetary problems. Credible engineering support to regulators, legislators, judges, and other decisions makers reduces the arbitrariness often observed during the regulatory process. This support should be void of politics, ideology, or any other non-engineering subject. The technical discipline addressing this need is regulatory engineering consisting of the engineering foundation of regulatory, legislative, and judicial decisions.

This Committee will facilitate ASME’s coordinated involvement in the environmental regulatory process. The fundamental objective is to ensure that the regulatory process is optimized and avoids arbitrary and unnecessary promulgation and application of regulations.

This committee will also identify environmental technology related issues that may require standards. It develops the needed information for the Council of Codes and Standards to initiate the process of development of codes and standards related to the mission of EED.

The Committee will coordinate ASME activities and act as a central focal point for resources on CCS between the various groups and divisions within ASME. The Committee will coordinate ASME activities with the other professional engineering societies (e.g., SPE, AIChE, etc. The Committee will assume ASME leadership in the Founders Society CCS Network. It will assume the regulatory leadership with the ASME Energy and Environmental Standards Advisory Board supplying the technical leadership on a unified CCS permit if EPA decides to proceed with the unified permit. The Committee will develop a newsletter on CCS issues.

The EED shall establish an Environmental Liaison Committee (ELC) to interface with other Knowledge and Communications (K&C) Divisions and Institutes within ASME.

Members of the ELC bring to the Committee their unique technical expertise, interests, and the concerns of their disciplines and Technical Divisions and Institutes. In serving on the ELC, all members must recognize that, while they represent their specific disciplines, in a broader sense they also represent ASME and the many diverse perspectives of its membership. In performing their work on the ELC, members may find it necessary at times to subjugate their own specific positions in consideration of the greater and broader interests of ASME.

The ELC comprises the Committee Chair, eighteen (18) regular members representing K&C and the Technical Institutes and an unspecified number of members-at-large (MAL) and liaison members from other groups within ASME. One of the strengths of the ELC is the broad participation of experts, who serve as MAL from many different organizations from both within and outside ASME. These members are highly valued and a critical part of the successful operation of the ELC.

By utilizing the expertise and resources of ASME’s Technical Divisions and Institutes, the ELC coordinates cross-cutting, environmental related activities. The actions of the ELC include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Provide leadership and coordination within K&C and ASME for environmental-related activities;
  2. Identify topics for and development of position statements, white papers or other communications on environmental-related subjects for K&C and ASME;
  3. Work across the ASME enterprise to collaborate on environmental-related opportunities and serve as a resource for ASME on environmental-related topics;
  4. Act as a liaison for ASME with outside organizations, such as the federal and state governments, other societies, etc. on environmental-related topics;
  5. Develop and coordinate forums at K&C and ASME conferences on environmental-related topics in conjunction with existing Technical Divisions or Institutes that have broad interest and appeal across several divisions and institutes;
  6. Actively seek participation from other ASME groups and committees by seeking their involvement in ELC on a continued basis; and encourage participation by other engineering professional societies related to environmental matter in a manner that is compatible and in agreement with the procedures and policies of the ASME.

 

 

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